North America

North America Travel and Photography Ideas

Top Pictograph/Petroglyph Sites in New Mexico

Comanche Gap Petroglyph / Jerry Willis
Comanche Gap Petroglyph / Jerry Willis

Comanche Gap Petroglyph / Jerry Willis

For rock art hunters, New Mexico offers a variety of locations to explore, some with petroglyphs numbering in the thousands over a very small area. Some locations are well known, while others take a significant effort in both time and research to find. And I like many avid rock art enthusiasts tend to keep the lesser known sites close to the vest. I do it for two reasons…half the fun is the research and discovery process. Nothing that is handed to you is as rewarding as finding it yourself. And second, there is little doubt that some among us hold this ancient art in less regard than others. Which has led to widespread vandalism of some of the more well known and easily accessible sites. That being said, there are plenty of publicly known locations to start your journey. And with a little effort you’ll find many more, some perhaps not seen by others in modern times.

Pictographs vs. Petroglyphs

What is the difference between a pictograph and petroglyph?. The answer lies in the tools used to create the art. Pictographs are essentially paintings, using varies pigments that produce different colors. Ochre was a widely used example that produces earthy shades of orange and red. But explore enough and you’ll find other colors like white, yellow, blue and green. On the other hand, Petroglyph were created by artists that used rocks and other blunt instruments to chip a design out of their sandstone canvas.

In my experience different tribes at different periods of time seemed to favor one style over the other. But it would be incorrect to say that pictographs were created by one group of Indians, and petroglyphs by another. As there example of both styles being used at the same time, and taking on the same artistic characteristics and subjects.

What is the rock art telling us?

At this point nobody knows precisely, and chance are good we never will. There is no equivalent to the Rosetta Stone in North American archaeology, and even if one were found, the rock art one finds in Utah and throughout the American Southwest is spread over such a vast period of time, and many different cultures that one translation wouldn’t fit them all.That being said, I don’t think we need to look farther than our own lives to get a sense of what the ancient Native Americans were recording in the sandstone. Like us they were human beings with aspirations, struggles, and questions about their place in the Universe.

 

If you look closely enough at the rock art and make some educated guesses you will see at this three different things.

The Natural World
There are repeated depictions of animals found in the real world. Bighorn sheep, snakes, buffalo, deer, elk and lizards. No doubt the Indians saw these as either a food source, a predator to be wary of, or both.  If you look at the Native American mythology of today you can also imagine these creatures taking on a spiritual or earthly mythological component. The oral traditions of the Raven and Coyote as a trickster that one sees in modern tribes is a good example.

The Spirit World
As noted above, there also seems to be a clear spiritual, or mythological component to the rock art that depicts creatures and anthropomorphic figures that are clearly not realistic representations of something found on Earth in the present or during the period ancient Indian tribes lived in the West. No doubt these creates find their origin in dreams, oral stories and spiritual beliefs about the world and the broader universe. Similar examples of such creatures can be found in the mythology of ancient Greece, the Norse, the Irish, etc.

The Celestial World
Finally, research has demonstrated that certain markings left behind were related to celestial events and observations. Such as arrows and other markers painted or carved onto rock faces where the sunlight only falls on key days of the astronomical calendar, such as the Summer and Winter Solstices, and the Spring and Fall Equinoxes. These markings alone tell us the Native Americans were keen observers of the night sky, and knew lunar, solar and constellation cycles well.

Popular New Mexico Rock Art Sites

Crow Canyon Petroglyphs (Dinétah Region Map)
The Crow Canyon Petroglyphs are located in Northwest New Mexico, near the Four Corners area, and the town of Farmington. The Petroglyphs are found in the traditional homeland of the Navajo, known as the Dinétah, and were largely carved by the Navajo between the 16th and 18th century. However, the rock art of the earlier Anasazi can also be seen.

The BLM recommends having a high-clearance, four-wheel drive vehicle to reach this site. Access is highly dependent on the weather, and requires crossing two washes that may be impassable in inclement weather. Drive south 19 miles from the junction of County Road 4450 and Highway 64. Follow the signs across Largo Wash, and then turn north and drive one mile to the mouth of Crow Canyon. Visit the Official Website.

Petroglyph Hill – Galisteo Basin

This is a petroglyph site outside of Galisteo, NM, that was purchased recently from the owners of the Thorton Ranch. Access to the site remains restricted but in recent years has been opened to guided public tours. Its estimated that over 2000 petrogylphs exist on this volcanic outcrop. A small fraction have been classified as Archaic, going back thousands of years, while the majority are believed to have been produced by New Mexico’s Puebloan peoples (1200-1325 A.D), in particular by a group that once inhabited the nearby Burnt Corn Pueblo archaeological site.

Another location related to this site, known as Comanche Gap (which remains closed to the public), offers some spectacular examples of the rock art produced by tribes in this area, and some of the best rock art examples I have seen in the Southwest.

La Cieneguilla Petroglyphn (Location Map)
This petroglyph site is located just outside of Santa Fe New Mexico. Follow Airport Road 3.3 miles west from the intersection of Airport Road and NM Road 599. You will see a sign marking the location as well as a gravel parking lot. The petroglyphs are located on a basalt cliff face overlooking the Santa Fe River.

The rock art at this location has been attributed to the Keres Pueblo peoples and was carved between the 13th and 17th centuries, covering a time before and after their contact with the Spanish. This location is known for its large number of hump-backed flute player images (known popularly as Kokopelli). Birds are also a common theme among the petroglyphs.

An interesting side note of this location, is that it falls along the route of the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, an ancient trade route between Mexico and the Indian tribes of the southwest, that was later co-opted by the Spanish for their own purposes, including spreading Christianity across the region.

Mesa Prieta Petroglyph (Google Maps)
The 148 acre Wells Petroglyph Preserve was setup to protect a section of the petroglyph located on Mesa Prieta, in north central New Mexico. The petroglyphs are carved into a layer of 3 million year old basalt. A small number of the images can be attributed to archaic Indians, and typically appear as geometric patterns, or hand prints, but the vast majority of the rock art is attributed to Ancient Puebloans migrating into New Mexico from the Four Corners region. It’s estimated that more than 75,000 petroglyphs are located on the mesa.

Visiting the Wells Petroglyph Preserve requires setting up a tour with the Mesa Prieta Preservation Project, whose offices are located in Velarde, NM.

Three Rivers Petroglyphs – (Google Maps)
The site is located 17 miles north of Tularosa, NM, and 28 miles south of Carrizozo, NM on U.S. 54, in southeastern New Mexico. Turn east from U.S. 54 at Three Rivers onto County Road B30 and travel five miles on paved road, following signs.  According to the BLM these petroglyphs, depicting humans, reptiles, fish, mammals and insects were carved using stone tools by the Jornada Mogollon between 900 and 1400 A.D. The Mogollon were an Ancestral Puebloan people related to the modern Puebloan peoples of New Mexico (Hopi, Zuni, Keres, and Towa) as well as the Anasazi and Hohokam and Patayan.

It’s estimated the Three Rivers site contains more than 21,000 petroglyphs spread across 50 acres. Visit the Official Website.

Top Pictograph/Petroglyph Sites in Utah

McConkie Ranch Petroglyph - Utah

For rock art hunters, Utah offers a veritable playground to explore, with hundreds, if not thousands of sites open to discovery. Some locations are well known, while others take a significant effort in both time and research to find. And I like many avid rock art enthusiats tend to keep the lesser known sites close to the vest. I do it for two reasons…half the fun is the research and discovery process. Nothing that is handed to you is as rewarding as finding it yourself. And second, there is little doubt that some among us hold this ancient art in less regard than others. Which has led to widespread vandalism of some of the more well known and easily accessible sites. With that, plenty can be said that will help those interested in exploring the wilds of Utah, and discovering a little bit of the history carved and painted on its sandstone walls.

horseshoe canyon great gallery

Horseshoe Canyon Great Gallery

Pictographs vs. Petroglyphs

What is the difference between a pictograph and petroglyph?. The answer lies in the tools used to create the art. Pictographs are essentially paintings, using varies pigments that produce different colors. Ochre was a widely used example that produces earthy shades of orange and red. But explore enough and you’ll find other colors like white, yellow, blue and green. On the other hand, Petroglyph were created by artists that used rocks and other blunt instruments to chip a design out of their sandstone canvas.

In my experience different tribes at different periods of time seemed to favor one style over the other. But it would be incorrect to say that pictographs were created by one group of Indians, and petroglyphs by another. As there example of both styles being used at the same time, and taking on the same artistic characteristics and subjects.

What is the rock art telling us?

At this point nobody knows precisely, and chance are good we never will. There is no equivalent to the Rosetta Stone in North American archaeology, and even if one were found, the rock art one finds in Utah and throughout the American Southwest is spread over such a vast period of time, and many different cultures that one translation wouldn’t fit them all.That being said, I don’t think we need to look farther than our own lives to get a sense of what the ancient Native Americans were recording in the sandstone. Like us they were human beings with aspirations, struggles, and questions about their place in the Universe.

If you look closely enough at the rock art and make some educated guesses you will see at least three different things.

The Natural World
There are repeated depictions of animals found in the real world. Bighorn sheep, snakes, buffalo, deer, elk and lizards. No doubt the Indians saw these as either a food source, a predator to be wary of, or both.  If you look at the Native American mythology of today you can also imagine these creatures taking on a spiritual or earthly mythological component. The oral traditions of the Raven and Coyote as a trickster that one sees in modern tribes is a good example.

The Spirit World
As noted above, there also seems to be a clear spiritual, or mythological component to the rock art that depicts creatures and anthropomorphic figures that are clearly not realistic representations of something found on Earth in the present or during the period ancient Indian tribes lived in the West. No doubt these creatures find their origin in dreams, oral stories and spiritual beliefs about the world and the broader universe. Similar examples of such creatures can be found in the mythology of ancient Greece, the Norse, the Irish, etc.

The Celestial World
Finally, research has demonstrated that certain markings left behind were related to celestial events and observations. Such as arrows and other markers painted or carved onto rock faces where the sunlight only falls on key days of the astronomical calendar, such as the Summer and Winter Solstices, and the Spring and Fall Equinoxes. These markings alone tell us the Native Americans were keen observers of the night sky, and knew lunar, solar and constellation cycles well.

Big Horn Sheep Petroglyph - Nine Mile Canyon Utah

Big Horn Sheep Petroglyph – Nine Mile Canyon Utah

Different Rock Art Styles/Traditions

At least three major groups were involved in producing the rock art found in Utah.

Archaic Indian Period (7500 B.C. to 300 A.D.?)
One of the major producers of pictograph rock art in Utah were a group of hunters and gathers known as Archaic Indians that lived in Utah from about 7500 B.C. until possibly as recent as 300 A.D. The art they left behind is known as the Barrier Canyon Style, whose name is derived from Barrier Canyon (now called Horseshoe Canyon) which lies to the west of Moab in an extension of Canyonlands National Park. Dating estimates for BCS seem to vary widely, and are based on the difficult task of radiocarbon dating pigments and rock falls.

Fremont /Anasazi Indian Period (100 A.D.-1300 A.D.)

While the Fremont and the Anasazi were very distinct groups, they shared a number of similar characteristics, including a semi-nomadic lifestyle that incorporated village life and farming with active hunting and gathering. They also share a common time frame, which is why I group them together here. In general I think it can be said that petroglyphs were there preferred form of expression, but pictographs including hand print displays have been attributed to them.

Ute Indian Period (1300 A.D. – 1880 A.D.)

The Ute Indian rock art is best distinguished from earlier art by the depiction of horses and their riders, as well as other more realistic depictions of animals, humans, etc. While horses were once native to North America they became extinct eons before humans arrived. Their depiction in recent petroglyphs provides a fairly precise date no earlier than the arrival of the Spanish, who were the first to bring horses back to the Western Hemisphere.

Popular Utah Rock Art Sites

Sego Canyon
I mention Sego Canyon first because its a bit unique in my experience, offering three distinct displays of rock art from the time periods described above. This allows the visitor to easily compare the different styles. Sego Canyon is located north of Moab and close to Utah’s border with Colorado off I-70. Just find Thompson Springs north of the highway, and follow its main road toward the Book Cliffs. Signs will direct you the rest of the way. Keep in mind that while part of the land containing petroglyphs is owned by the BLM, some are also on private land.

Horseshoe Canyon
This canyon contains what has been described as the “Michelangelo” of North American rock art – the Great Gallery. Within Horseshoe Canyon (once called Barrier Canyon) resides the largest and best preserved examples of the Barrier Canyon Style, in a series of rock art panels. The Great Gallery the largest of the panels and over 200 feet in length, has anthropomorphs as tall as 7 feet and more than a half dozen of a similar height. The access point to Horseshoe Canyon is a dirt road on the opposite side of the highway from the entrance to Goblin Valley. Look for signs to Horseshoe Canyon. In dry weather the road can be traveled by any well maintained vehicle with proper precaution. The road is about 30 miles, and the hike into the canyon is 7 miles round trip. The best time to enter the canyon is in the early morning, this will help you to avoid most of the afternoon heat when you exit, and the sun should be in a good spot for photograph most of the panels.

McConkie Ranch Petroglyph - Utah

McConkie Ranch Petroglyph – Utah

McConkie Ranch (Dry Fork Canyon)
McConkie Ranch is to the Fremont Petroglyph legacy what Horseshoe Canyon was to the Archaic Indians. Hands down this along with Horseshoe Canyon are the most amazing petroglyph/pictograph sites I have ever visited. The petroglyphs are varied, detailed, pristine, and in some cases very large. However, unlike the other sites mentioned here, this one is entirely on private land, which for now remains open to those who respect the site and its owners. However as was indicated to me that could change at any time. So if you haven’t been here before I highly recommend visiting sooner rather than later. And when you go, if you are lucky you might get to see their collection of arrowheads, spear points, baskets, and metates.

Newspaper Rock
Newspaper Rock is probably the best known and most widely photographed petroglyph panel in the United States. It features an array of different creatures, anthropomorphs and symbols from a variety of different cultures. The Archaic Indians, Fremont, Anasazi, Navajo and other Ancestral Puebloan cultures. This particular panel is located on the southern edge of Canyonlands, along the highway that leads to the Needles section of the park.

Rochester Panel
This panel is mostly of Fremont origin, but also displays art from other tribes, explorers, Mormon pioneers and unfortunately tourists. The acts of the latter though should not dissuade you from a visit,  as it is equal in caliber to Newspaper Rock in the amount and variety of art displayed in one spot. The panel is located just west of the San Rafael swell and east of the town of Emery.

Nine Mile Canyon
Nine Mile Canyon, located just north of Wellington in central Utah, was a vast artistic canvas for Fremont and Ute Indians. Its claim to fame is the sheer quantity of rock art that can be found along the canyon’s 46 mile length. To date over 1000 archaeological sites have been cataloged, including petroglyphs, dwelling ruins and grain stores. Examples of rock art include – Big Buffalo, Mickey Mouse, The Great Hunt, and the Sand Hill Crane Panel.

Moab Area
A variety of rock art can be found close to Moab, most of it outside the boundaries of Canyonlands and Arches. Cultures represented in the different panels include the Archaic Indians, the Fremont and Utes. Examples include Moab Man, Intestine Man, and Wolf Ranch

Sandstone Angel - San Rafael Swell - Utah

Sandstone Angel – San Rafael Swell – Utah

San Rafael Swell
The San Rafael Swell is a fairly vast area in central Utah and split by Interstate 70. While its known most for its amazing geologic display, it was also home to the Archaic and Fremont Indians. If you have the time, and know how to survive Utah’s brutal desert conditions, this is one place that if you spend enough time you will likely find something few have ever seen. Well known rock art locations include – Molen Reef Snake, Buckhorn Wash, Head of Sinbad, and Black Dragon Wash.

McKee Springs (Dinosaur National Monument)
The McKee Springs petroglyphs have been attributed to the Fremont Indians, who lived in the park over a thousand years ago. To reach the petroglyphs requires travel north of the Park’s main Utah entrance, and entering via the Island Park Road. The road should be in good condition during dry weather, but it is primarily dirt.  The Island Park area is also known for remnants left behind by European pioneers and is an access point for boaters traveling on the Green River.

Suggested Reading:

A Field Guide to Rock Art Symbols of the Greater Southwest – Alex Patterson
Ancient Peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau – Steven R. Simms

10 Amazing “Cold” Winter Vacation Destinations

Tromso, Norway Aurora Borealis

Forget the swimsuit, and flip flops. To enjoy these winter destinations, you’ll need to grab a parka, and embrace your inner polar bear. While I think it’s a natural tendency to let the mind wander south when temperatures drop and the snow begins to fall, there is a lot of beauty that winter offers those who runs toward it, instead of away. The following are just a few of the possibilities out there waiting.

Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival

Harbin Ice and Snow Festival - China

Harbin Ice Festival / Wikipedia

Every year, during the months of January and February, the Chinese put on the biggest ice and snow sculpture festival in the world. It’s a festival that’s taken place for more than 50 years, and features ice art multiple stories high, and covering acres in a virtual city of ice.

The best time to view and photograph the ice sculptures is at night, when lights embedded in and around the ice illuminate the sculptures in every imaginable color.  The snow sculptures are at their best on a clear, sunny day.

Harbin, located in China’s Heilongjiang Province, is located a fair distance from Beijing, where most international travelers enter China. A separate flight to the city takes about 2 hours, while the train takes more than 11 hours.

If getting to Harbin is a bit of a stretch this winter, here are a few others that may be closer to home.

Sapporo Snow Festival – Japan
Québec Winter Carnival – Canada
World Ice Art Championships – Fairbanks, Alaska

 

 

Churchill Polar Bear Watching – Manitoba, Canada

Dubbed by some as the polar bear capital of the world, Churchill offers unique access for wildlife photographers to a sizable polar bear population that converges along this section of Hudson Bay in October and November, waiting for the ice to thicken up on their feeding grounds in the Arctic Ocean.

A sizable tourist industry has developed around the annual event since the 1980’s, so numerous tour options are available to those interested in catching a view of one of the largest predators in the animal kingdom.

Given there are no roads into Churchill, the only options for reaching this outpost in the Subarctic, are by air and rail from Winnipeg.  A flight takes about 2 hours, a train ride, nearly 2 days.

Jigokudani Monkey Park – Japan

Snow Monkeys Nagano, Japan

Snow Monkeys, Japan / Wikipedia

If you’ve ever seen pictures of monkeys relaxing in a hot spring, heads covered in winter snow flakes, this is the place. This particular primate is known as the Japanese Macaque (ie snow monkeys), and resides in the park year-around. During the summer months they climb into the surrounding mountains to forging for fund, but during the 4 months when snow is common they return to the valley floor where the hot springs are located. Not surprisingly, Jigokudani (Hell valley) derives its name from the multitude of volcanic hot springs that fill the air throughout the area with steam. The park is located in Nagano Prefecture northwest of Tokyo. The prefecture is largely occupied by various mountain ranges, sometimes referred as the Japanese Alps. The Nagano area is also famous for the Winter Olypmics that was held there in 1998.

The nearest city to Jigokudani is Yamanouchi, which is approximately a 3 1/2 hour train ride from Tokyo. Once in Yamanouchi, visitors must hike into Jigokundani, to reach the springs where the macaque’s congregate.

And although your hike into the mountains is a relatively short one by most hiker’s standards, if you are absolutely exhausted when the day is done, Yamanouchi offers a number hot springs to soak your aching muscles in…with the occasional macaque coming by to see how the other half lives.

Official Website: http://www.jigokudani-yaenkoen.co.jp/english/html/top_e.htm

Antarctic Cruise

Antarctica Glacier and Sea Ice

Antarctica Glacier and Sea Ice

The irony of this cold winter vacation idea is that you are actually venturing to Antarctic during its summer season (November – February), the only time of year when conditions are warm enough that ships can safely reach our southern most continent.

The best time to go depends entirely on what you want to see. If pristine sea ice and icebergs floating by are what you are looking for, the earlier in the season you go, the better.  Otherwise the ice melts, breaks up and disperses into the southern ocean. The one downside of an early cruise is that certain destinations you wanted to see may still be iced up, and wildlife sightings are at a minimum. As you head into December the amount of sunlight peaks, increasing the chances of capturing beautiful winter landscapes against bright, deep blue skies. And toward the end of the Antarctic cruise season, wildlife sightings reach their maximum, particularly of whales.

Who you go with depends on your goals. If comfort and luxury are your priorities the big cruise ships are the best bet. If you want to experience Antarctica up close and personal, and capture that one in a million photograph, smaller cruises are you better choice.

Either direction you go, the cost to get there and back is pretty steep. Expect to pay $10k at a minimum, and if you want to do something completely wild, like trek to the South pole, you are looking at tens of thousands of dollars.

Glacier Express – Switzerland

The Glacier Express is a special train service that travels through the Swiss Alps between the mountain resorts Zermatt and St. Moritz. Operating year around it travels through some of this tiny country’s most spectacular scenery. The trip takes a little over 7.5 hours to completely, passing over hundreds of bridges (including the famous Landwasser Viaduct), and reaching elevations as high as 6,670 ft during the course of the journey.

Apostle Island Sea Caves – US

Apostle Island Ice Caves

Apostle Island Ice Caves / Sweet Alize

Part of the Apostle Island National Seashore in northwest Wisconsin, the sea caves are famous for the ice formations that build up over the winter, in and around the caves.  Carved from centuries of wave action and the seasonal freeze and thaw cycle, each cave chamber offers a unique ice display that can change from day to day.

The accessibility of the ice caves varies from one winter to the next. A warm winter can significantly affect the ice thickness on Lake Superior, preventing hikers from reaching the cliffs where the caves are located. So it is advised visitors check with the National Park Service before planning a trip.  The best time to visit the caves tends to run from January until mid-March.

The ice caves are located at the western end of the Mainland Unit of the park.  From the trailhead at the end of Meyers Beach, visitors descend a stairway to the beach and walk across the shore ice to the caves. Meyers Road is 18 miles west of Bayfield, WI.

Winter Fjord and Glacier Cruise – Norway

Tromso, Norway Aurora Borealis

Tromso, Norway – Aurora Borealis / Davide Gabino

During the winter several Norwegian cruise companies offer tours along Norway’s western coast. The largest and oldest of these, Hurtigruten, operates 11 ships that stop daily at 34 different cities from Bergen in the south, to Kirkenes near the northern border with Russia. One plus with Hurtigruten is that you can build your own itinerary and time table for moving along the coast. This allows you to plan extended excursions into Norway’s interior without worrying about the boat leaving you behind.

Norway’s rugged coast offers some of the greatest scenic beauty in Europe; from its glacially carved fjords, to the dramatic mountains and sheltered bays of the Lofoten Islands. Keep in mind that during the winter, cruise travel may be restricted in some of the fjords that might be on your list. However with proper planning alternative means to reach them maybe possible.

One of the pluses of visiting Norway in the winter is the strong possibility of seeing the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis), particularly as you approach and pass north of the Arctic Circle, near Bodo.

Deciding what month of winter to visit Norway, depends a lot of your goals. The best time for landscape photography is in late October, and early March when the light is greatest. Coincidentally the aurora is more likely to occur in early and late winter. However, the long nights of December offer a greater chance of seeing the northern lights during normal waking hours.

Another dynamic one must keep in mind when planning trips around Arctic winter destinations is the dramatic difference in available light over relatively short distances. The amount of sunlight in Kirkenese may be as much as 4 hours different than in Bergen.

Yukon Quest Sled Dog Race – Alaska

Each year in February a thousand mile sled dog race, known as the Yukon Quest,  is held between the city of Fairbanks, Alaska and Whitehorse, in the Yukon Territory of Canada. The race course follows the path of the mail and transportation routes used during the Klondike Gold Rush. The race was also meant to offer a tougher experience for mushers, than its rival the Iditarod, with surviving the event being just as important as winning. The start of the race alternates from year to year between Fairbanks, and Whitehorse.

Unlike the Iditarod, the Yukon Quest is fairly accessible to the average traveler willing to pack the miles, and put their vehicles and their bodies through the harsh winter conditions. All of the official race checkpoints are accessible by car, except Eagle, on the Yukon River, in Alaska.

Yukon Quest: Official Website

Bald Eagle Festival – Alaska

Bald Eagle - Alaska

Bald Eagle – Alaska / Yathin S Krishnappa

Drawn by a late run of spawning Coho and Chum salmon, more than 4,000 Bald Eagles have been known to congregate in the late fall (October-January) at Council Grounds, the confluence of three rivers ( the Chilkat, Tsirku and Klehini) north of Haines, Alaska. In 1982, the State of Alaska, understanding the important natural value of the site,  created the 48,000 acre Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve. Eagles are known to come from thousand of miles away, including from Washington State, the Northwest Territories of Canada, and the Alaska Peninsula.

To celebrate the annual congregation of eagles, a festival, is held each year in mid-November by the American Bald Eagle Foundation. Transportation and guided trips are offered to the preserve during the event, as well as photography workshops.

Bald Eagle Festival: Official Website